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Dos and don’ts of doggie travel etiquette

As published in Canadian Dogs Annual
Dos and don’ts of doggie travel etiquette

Do you travel during the holidays? Chances are, you’re planning to take your furry friend along with you. Whatever your destination, you’ll most likely find at least one hotel, inn, cottage or B&B that will accept animals.

The following “pet travel etiquette” suggestions will help ensure a relaxing and enjoyable stay for everyone.

DO:

  • Call ahead to make reservations, and to find out if there are any restrictions on the size and number of animals the accommodation will accept. Some won’t take dogs over a certain weight, or may charge extra.
  • Ask about extra amenities that may be provided for doggie guests. Some offer blankets, towels, bowls, and/or toys.
  • Find out ahead of time what rules and regulations are in place for animals. And be sure to follow them. For example, health regulations require that animals be kept out of areas where food is being prepared or served. Swimming pools are usually also off-limits.
  • Ensure your animal is house-trained and able to obey basic commands.
  • Keep your animal quiet, especially at night.
  • Pack a doggie travel bag with some safe, clean chew toys so your dog won’t be tempted to try her teeth out on a table leg.
  • Keep doggie poop bags on hand at all times. Always pick up after your animal, especially if she has an accident indoors.

DON’T:travel

  • Let your dog approach other people unless they express an interest in greeting and petting her. Not all your fellow guests will love animals as much as you do.
  • Allow your dog to get too close to another doggie guest without asking permission first.
  • Leave your dog alone in your room. Some become stressed when left on their own in a strange place and may bark, damage furnishings, or try to escape if a housekeeper opens the door. There’s also the danger that your companion could be stolen while you’re out.
  • Let your animal sleep on beds or chairs. Some places provide bedding for animals, or you can bring your dog’s own bed, a blanket or a crate for her to sleep in (if she’s crate-trained).
  • Permit your dog to run loose in the halls. You never know who you’ll run into. Keep her leashed whenever you’re in common areas.
  • Place water and food bowls on carpeting in case of spills. Instead, bring along a placemat for feeding time, or place bowls on tile floors.

 

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