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Toxic items in your home and garden

As published in Canadian Dogs Annual
Toxic items in your home and garden

Dogs are opportunistic omnivores, which means they sometimes ingest things they shouldn’t. To keep your buddy safe, avoid these toxic doggie dangers altogether or keep them well out of reach.

Keeping track of items that are toxic to your dog might seem a little overwhelming. The good news is it doesn’t have to be! Just a few simple modifications to your home and garden can keep your dog safe from these potential dangers.

Check out the lists below for what you should help your pooch avoid. You’ll also find Pet First Aid advice where applicable.

Outdoor hazards

Plants

While there are too many toxic plants to list in full, here are a few common ones to avoid in your garden. Please also be cautious when giving plants to dog owners as gifts!

Aloe veratoxic
Apple (leaves, seeds, stems)
Azalea
Baby’s breath
Chamomile
Cherry (leaves, seeds, stems)
Daffodil
English ivy
Iris
Lily of the valley
Mistletoe
Poinsettia
Rhubarb (leaves)

Pet First Aid: Contact a veterinarian or Animal Poison Centre. They will ask you a series of questions and advise you how (and whether) to induce vomiting and if your animal needs to see a veterinarian.

Acid, Alkali, and Petroleum Products

“Why on earth would my pet eat any of these?” you might wonder. Well, they actually might not intend to. Sometimes it’s a matter of the dog stepping on a toxin, or accidentally rubbing his coat against it. Your dog may then want to clean himself and subsequently ingest the toxin.

Motor oil
Gas
Diesel fuel
Asphalt
Lubricants
Fertilizer
Paint thinner
Lye
Glue

Pet First Aid: With these toxins, DO NOT induce vomiting. Immediately contact a veterinarian or Animal Poison Centre for advice.

Lizards and Toads

While they are certainly cute to look at and listen to, not all lizards and toads are safe for dogs to touch. Some can cause problems when your dog picks them up in her mouth or licks them.

Pet First Aid: Do your best to identify the creature in question. Snap a photo if you are safely able to. Immediately flush out your animal’s mouth with water. Call a veterinarian or Animal Poison Centre for advice.

Indoor hazards

Foods

While many foods can be safely shared with our furry friends, some are definitely toxic. Store the items below safely out of reach and locked away. Remember, some of these items may travel around with you in your purse or carry bag, so always keep these out of reach too!

Chocolate
Raisins
Grapes
Macadamia nuts
Coffee and tea
Onions
Garlic
Xylitol (artificial sweetener)
Avocado
Salt
Sugar-free chewing gum

Pet First Aid: Retain any packaging (if available) and try to determine the volume or weight of toxin ingested. Contact your veterinarian or Animal Poison Centre for advice on whether vomiting should be induced, or if veterinary care is required.

Medications

It’s easy to make the mistaken assumption that medications that are safe for us would also be for one’s dog. Many medications are in fact species-specific, meaning that what is safe for you might be toxic for Fido. Here are some medications and home remedies commonly used for humans that shouldn’t be given to pets without veterinary advice: toxic

Acetaminophen
Antacids
Aspirin
Antidepressants
Antibiotic ointment
Antihistamines
Birth control
Cold medication
Cough syrup
Eye drops
Ibuprofen
Laxatives
Inhalers
Insulin
Sleeping aid

Health and Hygiene Products

There are many common health and hygiene products that humans utilize regularly that are toxic to dogs. Please ensure they are stored out of reach and locked away to avoid temptation.

AntiperspirantNailpolish-ThinkstockPhotos-200413312-001
Body lotion
Essential oils
Hand sanitizer
Makeup remover
Nail polish and remover
Soap
Sunscreen
Toothpaste
Vitamins
Perfume
Laundry sheets (for dryer)

Pet First Aid: Because medications, health and hygiene products are made from such a variety of ingredients, it is important to seek out veterinary advice or assistance from a Pet Poison Centre.

Keep yourself armed with the latest information

When it comes to keeping our dogs safe, the best thing we can do is arm ourselves with credible knowledge and then act on it. You hold a lot of power when it comes to your dog’s health, so use it! Prevention is the best form of first aid!

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